Category Archives: Moulton News

Covid-19 Key Information for our Patients

The Prime Minister has declared a UK lockdown, so please only come to the surgery if you are asked to or if absolutely necessary and ensure that you observe the 2 metre social distancing rule. Where possible please attend on your own or one adult per child.

Entry to the Surgery will not be permitted, unless you have a pre-booked appointment.

You will be met at the Surgery by a staff member who will help you.

If you are unable to process a repeat prescription electronically and need to drop a repeat request form off, please post this into the white box near to the Surgery front entrance door. This is regularly emptied by the Dispensary team for processing.

You do not need to get an isolation note from a GP to give to your employer. You can download a 7/14 day isolation note from www.nhs.uk/self-isolation-advice

Changes to the blood taking unit

From Tuesday the 31st of March there are changes to the Blood Taking Unit at NGH. In order to keep patients safe at this time we are redirecting parts of this service to The Three Shires Hospital.

If you require a blood test you will need to contact the three shires hospital to make an appointment on these numbers:

Too get in contact with the Three Shires blood taking unit booking line, please call:

Three Shires will offer appointments Monday to Friday during the following times:

  • Monday -Friday 9am – 12:30pm and 13:30pm – 17:00pm

If you are a patient of our Maternity Unit they will make arrangements for you to have your bloods taken and you do not need to attend the Three Shires.

If your child requires a blood test the Blood Taking Unit at NGH will be open on Mondays from 10am-11am for paediatric patients only.

Manage your Hay Fever this Spring

Hay fever is caused by an allergy to pollen. The symptoms of hay fever are caused when a person has an allergic reaction to pollen. Common hay fever symptoms are:

  • a runny, itchy and/or blocked nose
  • sneezing
  • itchy eyes

Pollen is a fine powder released by plants as part of their reproductive cycle. Pollen contains proteins that can cause the nose, eyes, throat and sinuses to become swollen, irritated and inflamed.

How to treat hay fever

Many hay fever symptoms can be controlled with over-the-counter medication at your local pharmacy.

  • Steroid nasal sprayshelp to prevent or reduce inflammation in the lining of the nose and some can help to relieve watery eyes.
    Available from your local pharmacy.
  • Antihistamineshelp to relieve a runny nose, sneezing, itching and watery eyes. Some types of antihistamines make you drowsy and are best taken before bed. Newer antihistamines are less likely to make you drowsy and are a common choice for children and people with milder or occasional symptoms of hay fever.
    Available from your local pharmacy.
  • Decongestant nasal sprays and tabletsare used to unblock the nose. They should never be taken for more than a few days at a time.
    Available from your local pharmacy.
  • Eye dropscan be used to treat itchy or watery eyes.
    Available from your local pharmacy.

If none of the above treatments are effective for you, please book an appointment to discuss other treatments.

Useful Links

DNAs

As you are aware, surgeries generally are struggling to cope with the high demand on their services and patients are often experiencing long waits when booking routine appointments. Unfortunately many patients fail to attend their appointments without informing the practice. These appointments could have been offered to other patients. In order to try to address this problem the practice has adopted a policy whereby if a patient does not attend 3 appointments in 12 months a warning letter will be sent to the patient stating that a further occurrence may result in removal from the practice list.

During the month of February a total of 87 patients did not attend their appointment.

We thank all 3515 patients that attended their appointment and those that cancelled it in good time so we could offer it to another patient.

Novel Coronavirus

Click image to enlarge

The NHS and Public Health England (PHE) are extremely well prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. The current risk to the general public is moderate.

You can help too.

Germs can live on some surfaces for hours. To protect yourself and others:

  • Always carry tissues with you and use them to catch your cough or sneeze.
  • Bin the tissue, and to kill the germs, wash your hands with soap and water, or use a sanitiser gel.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are unwell.
  • If you have arrived back from an affected area within the last 14 days and develop symptoms of cough or fever or shortness of breath, you should immediately:
    • Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people as you would with the flu
    • Call NHS 111 to inform them of your recent travel to the country

This is the best way to slow the spread of almost any germs, including Coronavirus.

More information, including a list of the affected areas is available by logging onto gov.uk/coronavirus

NHS 111

Think you need medical help right now? NHS 111 is available to offer advice on the best course of action to take when you have an urgent but nonlife-threatening health concern.

NHS 111 allows you to have access to advice 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by phone and online and, if necessary, they can arrange for you to speak to relevant healthcare professionals, including nurses, emergency dentists, or even GPs.

The advisors can also arrange face-to-face appointments, and if you are assessed as needing an ambulance, one will be sent directly. NHS 111 provides you with a convenient way to get the right help or advice when you need it. Whether over the phone or online, NHS 111 will ensure that you get the right care, from the right person, as quickly as possible. So, if you think you need urgent medical help, call 111 or go online at 111.nhs.uk. ‘Help Us Help You’ know what to do

Keep Antibiotics Working

165 new antibiotic resistant infections every day in England Latest data from Public Health England shows there were an estimated 61,000 antibiotic resistant infections in 2018 – that’s 165 a day.

Taking antibiotics encourages harmful bacteria that live inside you to become resistant. This means that antibiotics may not work when you really need them.

Antibiotics are essential to treat serious bacterial infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. However, they are frequently being used to treat illnesses like coughs, earache and sore throats that can get better by themselves.

The ‘Keep Antibiotics Working’ campaign returns to alert the public to the risks of antibiotic resistance, urging them to always take their doctor, nurse or healthcare professional’s advice on antibiotics.

For further information on antibiotic resistance visit nhs.uk/antibiotics.

Ask Your Pharmacist and Get the right advice in a place that’s convenient for you!

Remember to ‘think pharmacy first’ if you need advice or treatment for common illnesses like coughs, colds, eye infections and earaches.

As highly trained health care professionals, there’s a lot more that community pharmacists can help you with too.

Sometimes people go to a doctor or even a hospital for things that could be sorted out more conveniently at the pharmacy. You can consult your pharmacist about a wide range of health care issues, not just about medicines.

So, for convenient access to medicines, NHS services, support for healthy living and prompt clinical advice, Ask Your Pharmacist!

Get the right advice from the right people in a place convenient for you!

Pharmacists work with other professionals, such as doctors and nurses, to give you the best possible care as part of the NHS team.

Every pharmacist trains initially for five years in the use of medicines, managing minor illnesses and providing health & wellbeing advice. Pharmacists continue to develop their clinical and professional skills throughout their career.

All pharmacy staff have accredited medicines training.

Your community pharmacy is the right place to go for help with minor illnesses such as coughs, colds, eye infections and earache. The pharmacist can give clinical advice on many other matters too.

Sometimes your local doctors’ surgery will suggest you see your local pharmacist for convenient, professional advice and treatment for minor illnesses. Or your pharmacist may refer you to the GP, if it’s something that can’t be sorted out in the pharmacy or requires further investigation.